Filthy tourists leave underwear and face masks hanging from trees at ancient Scots beauty spot

Tourists have been slammed for hanging dirty face masks, thongs, socks and bras from trees at an ancient pilgrimage beauty spot in the Scottish Highlands.

Pictures taken at the Munlochy Clootie Well in Ross and Cromarty have been branded branded “rank” after visitors tied their dirty laundry to branches in a bid to ward off sickness and bring them luck.

Traditionally, Clootie Wells are places of pilgrimage in Celtic areas where strips of cloth and rags are left as part of an ancient healing ritual.



a person wearing a costume: Bras are amongst the items being left at the the Munlochy Clootie Well


© Deadline
Bras are amongst the items being left at the the Munlochy Clootie Well

The rags are meant to be dipped in a nearby well and tied to a nearby tree in the hope that sickness or ailment will fade as the rags disintegrate.

But now, inconsiderate explorers have been blasted for leaving their dirty, unhygienic undergarments behind in the woodlands.

John MacInnes, from Hamilton, South Lanarkshire, shared photographs of the mess on Facebook, writing: “The Clootie Well, Munlochy. Now this is one where I’m still not sure what to think.



a group of people walking down a dirt road: Pictures taken at the Munlochy Clootie Well in Ross and Cromarty have been branded branded


© Deadline
Pictures taken at the Munlochy Clootie Well in Ross and Cromarty have been branded branded

“Is it just creating a right mess with people hanging all manner of garments including bras and thongs, jeans, shorts, ties, t-shirts etc?”

Dozens of social media users commented on the post, shocked by the images.

Edie McKeague wrote: “Unless you know the tradition behind the Clootie Wells you won’t understand why pieces of clothing are left.

“It’s not just to flash your knickers or bra or socks etc at passing traffic. There is a history to it.

“It’s part of the Celtic culture of our land. Myths superstition–maybe. But so is Halloween Christmas Santa Easter Bunny and Tooth Fairy.

Lynette Potter said: “Looks disgusting.”

Morag Courten wrote: “When I was a child growing up on the Black Isle, (50 odd years ago), the Clootie Well was on the roadside and people hung a piece of cloot (cloth) above it and made a wish.

Next Post

Roundball Classic charity event pivots to remote format - Sports - The Topeka Capital-Journal

Tue Sep 8 , 2020
LAWRENCE — One of the area’s most recognizable charity events will have a new look when it returns at 7 p.m. Friday. The Rock Chalk Roundball Classic, an annual fundraiser for local families affected by pediatric cancer, has pivoted to a long-distance format this year due to travel and other […]