More Synthetic Microfibers Now End up on Land Than in Water

Many of us are now aware that synthetic microfiber pollution is a real problem. Thanks to extensive reporting in recent years, the release of synthetic fibers from laundry into the natural environment has gone from being “the biggest environmental problem you’ve never heard of” (as one ecologist called it back in 2011) to something that’s on the personal radar of most moderately-informed adults.

But just how big a problem is this form of pollution? A group of researchers from the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara, set out to quantify the situation in a new open-access study published in the journal PLOS One. What they found was that, between 1950 (when synthetic clothing was first created) and 2016, an estimated 5.6 Mt (million metric tons) have been emitted from apparel washing worldwide, with half of it being generated in just the past

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How Extensive Is Terrestrial Microplastic Pollution?

The amount of synthetic microfiber we shed into our waterways has been of great concern over the last few years, and for good reason: Every laundry cycle releases in its wastewater tens of thousands of tiny, near-invisible plastic fibers whose persistence and accumulation can affect aquatic habitats and food systems, and ultimately our own bodies in ways we have yet to discover.

And according to researchers from University of California (UC) Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, that’s not the whole picture. In a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE, they found that the volume of synthetic microfibers we release to terrestrial environments from our wash cycles rivals—and may soon eclipse—the amount that winds up in our oceans, rivers, and lakes.

“The emissions of microfibers onto terrestrial environments—that was a known process. But the magnitude of the issue was not well known,” said Jenna

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Simple steps to spring clean your wardrobe | The Examiner

life-style, Spring clean wardrobe

With the warmer weather settling in, spring is the ideal time to declutter your wardrobe. Wellness coach and Australia’s first KonMari method trained organising consultant, Sally Flower has great advice for spring cleaning your wardrobe effectively. “In this current crazy world where chaos, stress and anxiety are prevalent more than ever, having a stress-free start to your day is key,” says Sally. “An organised wardrobe helps create clarity and begins your morning with a positive attitude.” Maximise closet space. The first step is to declutter before you organise. Streamline your wardrobe. Cleaning out any unworn or old clothes and accessories will allow you to see the amount of closet space you have. Before rearranging your closet, it’s important to visualise the storage solutions that will fit your space. Measure your wardrobe dimensions and create designated areas for each category of your belongings. Remember to allocate space

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Consumer Reports: Removing stains from kids’ clothing

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CONSUMER REPORTS — Back to school might look a little different this year, but some things never change, like the exceptional ability of kids to stain their clothing. Whether it’s grass, gum, or more artistic stains like crayon or Play-Doh.

The experts at Consumer Reports have some helpful tips on removing stains.

If the stain is still fresh, water alone may actually remove it. But, if the stain has set in, a few household items and a good detergent to pretreat it can help.

For crayon — fresh or melted — remove as much as possible. Then, work a small amount of dish detergent into the stain. Let it sit for a few minutes, then rub the fabric under warm water.

Afterward, wash the clothing in the hottest water temperature allowed for the

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Magic Laundry Services of Montebello, California Earns Hygienically Clean Hospitality Certification

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — September 18, 2020 — Magic Laundry Services, an independently-owned laundry serving the hospitality markets in California, has become the first laundry in California to achieve the Hygienically Clean Hospitality certification. This achievement reflects their commitment to best management practices (BMPs) in laundering as verified by on-site inspection and capability to produce hygienically clean textiles as quantified by ongoing microbial testing.

The certification confirms their dedication to compliance and processing textiles using BMPs as described in their quality assurance documentation, the focal point for Hygienically Clean inspectors’ evaluation of critical control points that minimize risk. The independent, third-party inspection confirms essential evidence that:

  • Employees are properly trained and protected
  • Managers understand legal requirements
  • OSHA-compliant
  • Physical plant operates effectively

In addition, the facility passed three rounds of outcome-based microbial testing, indicating that their processes are producing hygienically clean linens and garments with no harmful presence of bacteria and fungus.

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Kiss those stains goodbye with these cleaning tricks

You may notice some new stains on your kids’ clothes. Here’s how to get rid of them.

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Back to school might look a little different this year. But some things never change, like the  exceptional ability of kids to stain their clothing, whether it’s grass, gum, or more artistic stains like crayon or Play-Doh. The experts at Consumer Reports have some helpful tips on removing stains. 

If the stain is still fresh, water alone may actually remove it. But if the stain has set in, a few household items and a good detergent to pretreat it can help.

For crayon—fresh or melted—remove as much as possible. Then work a small amount of dish detergent into the stain. Let it sit for a few minutes, then rub the fabric under warm water. Afterward, wash the clothing in the hottest water temperature allowed for the specific fabric.

Use regular

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Preventing emissions at source can mitigate microfiber pollution, shows study

The amount of synthetic microfiber we shed into our waterways has been of great concern over the last few years, and for good reason: Every laundry cycle releases in its wastewater tens of thousands of tiny, near-invisible plastic fibers whose persistence and accumulation can affect aquatic habitats and food systems, and ultimately our own bodies in ways we have yet to discover.

And according to researchers from UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, that’s not the whole picture.

In a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE, they found that the volume of synthetic microfibers we release to terrestrial environments from our wash cycles rivals — and may soon eclipse — the amount that winds up in our oceans, rivers and lakes.

“The emissions of microfibers onto terrestrial environments — that was a known process. But

Read More

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How to get crayon, Play-Doh, gum stains out of kids’ clothes

Back to school might look a little different this year, but some things never change, including a child’s exceptional ability to stain their clothing.

All stains are not created equally and should not be treated the same way. Depending on whether the stain was caused by grass, gum, or a crayon or Play-Doh Consumer Reports says you need to employ a different method to remove it.

When a stain happens you need to act fast.

“If the stain is still fresh, water alone may actually remove it. But if you’re a little too late and the stain has set, a few household items and a good detergent to pre-treat stains can help,” said Sara Morrow Harcourt, Consumer Reports Home Editor.

For crayon, fresh or melted, remove as much of the crayon pieces as possible. Then work a dish detergent into the stain. Let it sit for a few minutes and

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Ethiopia: Kalkidan’s Vision to Adorn Ethiopians With Traditional Costumes

Kalkidan Agumas was born in Durbete, Amhara State in 1985 EC. She came to Addis while she was 10. It was her aunt who brought her to the capital. She attended her elementary school education at Misrak Goh elementary school. It was in 2010 Kalkidan took her 8th grade National Examination. And she followed her secondary school career at Menelik II secondary school. In 2016 Kalkidan joined Wolkite University to study Biology. She received her bachelor degree in Biology in 2018 after a three-year stay there.

According to her, campus life is a bifacial just like heaven and hell as it exposes students both to good and bad life experiences. It was good for Kalkidan as she used the opportunity to deepen her knowledge, to secure income from tailoring garments to students and to build self-confidence. During those campus days, using her free time she used to prepare and deliver

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